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skii

  • Imprimer

    #SKII: A Sucess Key (SK) issued from a traditional drink in Japan, #Saké and its craftman's fabrication [#storytelling @SKII @ProcterGamble]

    A NICE AND UNBELIEVABLE STORY

    During a visit of a factory Saké in Kobe (Japan), Japanese scientists find that the hands of sake brewers, constantly immersed in sake yeast ferments during the manufacturing process, are incredibly soft and young, and contrast with their faces marked by old age.

    Discover in this eye-catching movie the story of Sucess Key of SKII, a Japanese skincare brand born in 1970.

    Click to watch the short video about the Saké brewers


    1970- Discover of the Pitera, the ingredient component of th SKII anti-ageing cream

    1990- SKII is bought by Procter & Gamble. This is the beginning of an incredible story with a sales development all over the World: Asia, Australia, Spain, UK, USA and South America. 

     

  • Imprimer

    Marriage Market Takeover and #SKII: a lesson in #humanity and #optimism [@plaubignat @ygourven @SKII_ID #promiseconsultinginc #beauty]

    I discussed in a recent post the emotion I felt when I visualized the last campaign of the cosmetics brand SKII "Marriage Market Takeover".

    What is the "Marriage Market"? This is a place where parents show off their daughters who are over 25 years old so that they can find the true love. These young women are seen as a shame by the society and even among their own families as a married woman is the main insurance for grand-fathers and grand-mothers that they will be taken care of when they get retired (as pensions are still almost inexistent in China). The pejorative term exists to design them, "Sheng Nu" which might be translated by "Takeover Women".

    marriage, marriage market takeover, skII, SKII_ID

    Well, story could have ended up like this. But sometimes there are some miracles on the social networks. I was contacted by the person in charge of the digital communication of the brand following my initial post and I was adressed a very kind mail telling me more about the brand's objectives and above all about the destiny of these women deliberately highlighted in this short documentary that sparked a huge amount of attention and conversation online.

    For those of my followers that were also removed by this story and want to know more about the fate of these young women, discover three of their individual interviews below by clicking on their image and share it with relatives and friends. 

    [HU TING - 35 years - Procurement Department of a Pharmacuetical Company]

    marriage, marriage market takeover, skII, SKII_ID

    [ZHU LI - 36 years - Editor for a Magazine]

    marriage, marriage market takeover, skII, SKII_ID

    [WANG XIAO QI - 27 years - Teach acting in a Kindergarten]

    marriage, marriage market takeover, skII, SKII_ID

    Again, thank you for this initiative and for the supplied information and material. A beautiful illustration that the CSR is not a hollow concept when it comes to defending the cause of women around the world.       

     

  • Imprimer

    SK-II Addresses China’s Leftover Women in ‘Marriage Market Takeover’ Film [#SKII #changedestiny campaign #ad #china #skincare]

    April 7, 2016 from Jing Daily

    A new ad campaign by luxury cosmetics brand SK-II addresses a social issue in China that doesn’t usually receive much attention in the country’s commercial scene: the plight of sheng nu, or “leftover women.”

    20160409 0751.png

    If one wasn’t aware of how twenty-something single women are traditionally viewed by their parents’ generation in China, the start of the four-minute-long video ad strikingly makes it clear. It begins by juxtaposing a montage of photographs of young girls with audio phrases from their parents, such as, “I won’t die in peace unless you are married,” “Don’t be so free willed,” and “You’re too picky.”

    Chinese women are put under an incredible amount of social pressure to get married, so much so that businesses pop up around Chinese New Year that give single women (and men) the opportunity to rent a boyfriend or girlfriend to fool and appease their family over the holidays. The term sheng nu is a derogatory one used for those who haven’t found a husband by their mid to late twenties.

    For the women featured in the film, this term brings on feelings of guilt. “Not getting married is a sign of disrespect,” says one woman before tearfully apologizing to the camera for disappointing her family.

    Then, in an emotional turn of events, the women head to the Marriage Market in Shanghai, where parents normally go to browse the “resumes” of potential suitors for their daughters. This time, however, the women would be the ones delivering a message to their parents.

    The parents find beautiful photos of the women at the market, each paired with statements of confidence like, “I don’t want to get married just for the sake of marriage. I won’t live happily that way.”

    This touching film, produced by Swedish ad agency Forsman & Bodenfors, is the latest installment of SK-II’s global #changedestiny campaign, which encourages women to “change their DNA” to take control of their future. SK-II’s website has additional short films that show women having courage to change their DNA, including one starring Chinese actress Tang Wei and another featuring Chief Strategy Officer for Ebay Greater China Vvivi Hu.

    In the case of the sheng nu campaign, the confident subjects behind #changedestiny speaks volumes to affluent Chinese women. A 2014 report by Grant Thornton International showed that about 63 percent of Chinese businesses have female CFOs, and women are going to great lengths to have their own eggs frozen so that they can put things like having children—and marriage—second to their successful careers.

    So far, the “Marriage Market Takeover” Youtube video has more than 250,000 hits after two days of being released, and its WeChat post is quickly catching up with more than 100,000 pageviews and a growing number of comments of encouragement from supportive fans.

    Credits:

    Brand Director: Kylene Campos
    Art Direction: Sophia Lindholm and Karina Ullensvang
    Director: Floyd Russ
    Digital Producer: Peter Gaudiano
    Film Editor: Cut + Run
    Production: Tool of North America
    Producer: Alexander Blidner

    [READ THE FULL ARTICLE IN JING DAILY]

  • Imprimer

    SK-II Addresses China’s Leftover Women in ‘Marriage Market Takeover’ Film [#SKII #changedestiny campaign #ad #china #skincare]

     April 7, 20, Jing Daily

    “I won’t die in peace unless you are married,” says one parent in new SK-II ad about “leftover women” in China

    skII, china, cosmetics, ad, campaign, change your destiny

    A new ad campaign by luxury cosmetics brand SK-II addresses a social issue in China that doesn’t usually receive much attention in the country’s commercial scene: the plight of sheng nu, or “leftover women.

    If one wasn’t aware of how twenty-something single women are traditionally viewed by their parents’ generation in China, the start of the four-minute-long video ad strikingly makes it clear. It begins by juxtaposing a montage of photographs of young girls with audio phrases from their parents, such as, “I won’t die in peace unless you are married,” “Don’t be so free willed,” and “You’re too picky.”

    Chinese women are put under an incredible amount of social pressure to get married, so much so that businesses pop up around Chinese New Year that give single women (and men) the opportunity to rent a boyfriend or girlfriend to fool and appease their family over the holidays. The term sheng nu is a derogatory one used for those who haven’t found a husband by their mid to late twenties.

    For the women featured in the film, this term brings on feelings of guilt. “Not getting married is a sign of disrespect,” says one woman before tearfully apologizing to the camera for disappointing her family.

    Then, in an emotional turn of events, the women head to the Marriage Market in Shanghai, where parents normally go to browse the “resumes” of potential suitors for their daughters. This time, however, the women would be the ones delivering a message to their parents.

    The parents find beautiful photos of the women at the market, each paired with statements of confidence like, “I don’t want to get married just for the sake of marriage. I won’t live happily that way.”

    This touching film, produced by Swedish ad agency Forsman & Bodenfors, is the latest installment of SK-II’s global #changedestiny campaign, which encourages women to “change their DNA” to take control of their future. SK-II’s website has additional short films that show women having courage to change their DNA, including one starring Chinese actress Tang Wei and another featuring Chief Strategy Officer for Ebay Greater China Vvivi Hu.

    In the case of the sheng nu campaign, the confident subjects behind #changedestiny speaks volumes to affluent Chinese women. A 2014 report by Grant Thornton International showed that about 63 percent of Chinese businesses have female CFOs, and women are going to great lengths to have their own eggs frozen so that they can put things like having children—and marriage—second to their successful careers.

    So far, the “Marriage Market Takeover” Youtube video has more than 250,000 hits after two days of being released, and its WeChat post is quickly catching up with more than 100,000 pageviews and a growing number of comments of encouragement from supportive fans.

    Credits:

    Brand Director: Kylene Campos
    Art Direction: Sophia Lindholm and Karina Ullensvang
    Director: Floyd Russ
    Digital Producer: Peter Gaudiano
    Film Editor: Cut + Run
    Production: Tool of North America
    Producer: Alexander Blidner