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luxury

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    [#LUXURYLAB] [SHOP] | #Stella #McCartney joins #Alibaba’s exclusive #Luxury #Pavilion | @STYLE

    DE YILING PAN | STYLE | http://bit.ly/2BMrocF

    #Stella #McCartney joins #Alibaba’s exclusive #Luxury #Pavilion

    British luxury brand Stella McCartney has launched a flash sale store on Alibaba’s invitation-only Luxury Pavilion portal, which is reserved for the country’s VIP members, to sell items from fashion to footwear and handbags. The move is a first among fashion labels owned by Kering, the parent company of Gucci, Yves Saint Laurent and Bottega Veneta.

    Stella McCartney is using Tmall Space, an “online pop-up store” marketing tool. The flash sale continues until January 15. Stella McCartney’s eco-friendly fashion is fuelled by her innovative and tenacious spirit
    The British fashion powerhouse follows LVMH-owned Spanish fashion brand Loewe as the second big-name luxury player to utilise Luxury Pavilion since its launch in August.

    We’re delighted to work with Stella McCartney and are excited to see how Chinese consumers respond to their presence,” says Sébastien Badault, Alibaba Group’s director of international fashion and luxury and managing director for France. The development signals an easing in tension between the French luxury conglomerate and China’s e-commerce behemoth.

    In August, Kering Group dropped a lawsuit against Alibaba, which it accused of being involved in the sales of fake designer handbags, and signed a joint agreement to fight against fake goods sellers and to protect its brands’ intellectual property rights. The about-turn highlights the importance of the Chinese e-commerce retail market for international luxury brands. According to KPMG, half of domestic luxury consumption in China will be generated online by 2020.

    For Alibaba, which owns the South China Morning Post, receiving the endorsement from Kering is a strong boost to the expansion of its luxury business. Whether Luxury Pavilion will become a key place for luxury brands to sell products in the country remains to be seen. The e-commerce giant, which traditionally targets the mass market, faces an uphill battle to reposition itself as a legitimate luxury goods e-tail platform.

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    [#CONSOLAB] [SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT] | #Guerlain, #luxury #cosmetics flag-bearer for #sustainable #development | @PREMIUM BEAUTYNEWS

    DE FRISTEL MILET | PREMIUM BEAUTY NEWS | http://bit.ly/2hLXpcr

    #Guerlain, #luxury #cosmetics flag-bearer for #sustainable #development

    Spurred on by CEO Laurent Boillot, Guerlain included sustainable development to the company’s strategy as soon as 2007. Although they had remained discreet about their approach since then, the brand has just published a third report celebrating “10 years of sustainable commitment, In the Name of Beauty”, highlighting both their achievements and ambitions for 2020. The decision to finally communicate on this resulted from a nurtured strategic commitment for the future, on all levels. Sandrine Sommer, Sustainable Development Director of the prestigious brand, detailed its content and scope for Premium Beauty News.

    Premium Beauty News - In 2007, luxury and sustainable development hardly worked hand in hand. How was this initiative born? 

    Sandrine Sommer - It was born from a strong-willed man, Laurent Boillot, who had just taken over Maison Guerlain. Sustainable commitment was mainly a personal belief. But beyond that, sustainable development definitely had to be an integral part of the company’s strategy to develop, pass on, and preserve Guerlain’s heritage.

    Premium Beauty News - Protection of bees (they are the Maison’s emblem), biodiversity, climate, eco-design, social responsibility… your commitment is global and you have already made very concrete achievements, like the new Orchidée Impériale pack lightened by 60%. After 10 years, what are your greatest satisfactions?

    Sandrine Sommer - Internal mobilization and involvement, first. From the very beginning, we implemented an efficient collaborative organization with a “sustainable development” steering committee composed of 18 people from every department in the company. For sustainable development to be a project on the level of the whole company, with a real will to change and the right structure to do it, and for our employees to be the best ambassadors, it was essential for me to have all trades involved and get one referent per department. In addition, I am very proud of having brought up to date the Abeille bottles, making them indefinitely refillable, thanks to our perfume fountains. To me, the perfumer Guerlain concept embodies sustainable luxury. And we have great ambitions to gradually deploy the concept.

    Guerlain, luxury, cosmetics, sustainable development

    Premium Beauty News - What are your objectives for 2020?

    Sandrine Sommer - There are many of them, but they can be grouped into four main challenges: biodiversity preservation. We already work with sustainable sourcing players for Guerlain’s iconic raw materials. Also, we have made a lot of efforts for bee protection, in particular on Brittany’s Île d’Ouessant, and we are now developing our projects on the global level. The second challenge for us is ecodesign. It is probably one of the most complex. The idea is to make things as, or even more beautiful, while preserving the planet’s resources. We aim for 100% of our new products to be ecodesigned by 2020. Then, as far as climate is concerned, we have committed to reduce our CO2 emissions by half compared to 2007, for example by choosing maritime transport. Lastly, as regards social responsibility, definitely one of our own priorities, we support a global association dedicated to self-esteem: Look Good Feel Better. They offer women receiving cancer treatment free beauty workshops in hospitals. By 2020, we would like to be able to support them in all countries where Guerlain has settled.

    Premium Beauty News - How did the transition go with your suppliers?

    Sandrine Sommer - We worked together with the LVMH Perfume & Cosmetics branch to develop a responsible purchasing charter and define a number of guidelines that would help us make progress. The charter was co-set up with steering suppliers and is used as a working basis to go forward together, that was most important.

    Premium Beauty News - How did you make the notions of environmental protection and luxury match?

    Sandrine Sommer - They are not incompatible, there are actually matching elements between luxury and sustainable development that are almost natural, even consubstantial, in particular the notions of long periods of time, of the selection of rare and precious raw materials that require protection, or of know-how that needs to be passed on…

    On the contrary, it can be difficult to communicate, because we are aware of the fact that we are not exemplary yet – no one is. It is an issue on which we have been innovating on a daily basis. Many luxury companies have been working for a long time on this, but they do not make it public that much. Guerlain has only just started, but we still want to keep humble and sincere in how we do it. It is a continuous improvement process, a long, step-by-step building process, without compromising on the quality and prestige perceived with luxury houses.

    The “green” vision of sustainable development is behind us now. It is time to highlight beautiful, sustainable innovations to reconcile both. That is what the challenge involves.

    Premium Beauty News - Is your public ready to hear these arguments?

    Sandrine Sommer - The luxury public is getting increasingly sensitive to this. To our customers, it is just obvious, as long as you are a luxury brand, you should do things well. It is up to us to go farther and anticipate their questions and aspirations. For example, we have communicated on our rare, natural materials for long. Today, we are going further, by putting an emphasis on our commitment to protect biodiversity in light of these rare ecosystems.

    We have a prescribing, training role: it is up to us to raise customer awareness.

    Premium Beauty News - How are you going to communicate on this issue?

    Sandrine Sommer - Every year, we organize two events at Guerlain Champs-Élysées to put forward committed men and women. These players work on Sustainable Development on a daily basis. They come to share their experiences with a concerned public, my counterparts from different companies and industries, associations, all our stakeholders… It is a different way to communicate, but we do believe in the pollination of ideas and the strength of committed networks.

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    [LUXURY LAB] [ONLINE] | #JD.com launches #luxury #e-commerce #platform #Toplife | @STYLE

    DE VIVAN CHEN | STYLE | http://bit.ly/2i4D1GO

    #JD.com launches #luxury #e-commerce #platform #Toplife

    Chinese online retailer flexes its muscles in the luxury sector with the launch of its new site, Toplife, rivalling Alibaba’s Luxury Pavilion.

    Chinese e-commerce sites have been warring over who gets the biggest slice of the luxury sector. Following Alibaba’s launch in August of Luxury Pavilion – an e-commerce platform on its TMall shopping site dedicated to high-end, premier luxury brands the likes of Burberry, Hugo Boss and La Mer – JD.com has unveiled today its first-ever luxury online platform called Toplife. Alibaba Group is the owner of the South China Morning Post.

    The site is said to be “an exclusive full-price online shopping platform” that allows brands to sell directly to consumers through a luxury e-commerce ecosystem that incorporates online stores, premium customer service, delivery and marketing, and warehousing and inventory.

    “Our deep understanding of high-end consumers has enabled us to launch a luxury e-commerce ecosystem that provides a truly premium shopping experience, and helps partners tell their brand story to local consumers,” says Richard Liu, chairman and CEO of JD.com, in a statement. “Toplife aims to mirror the offline luxury shopping experience in a premium e-commerce experience.”

    JD.com, luxury, e-commerce, plateform, Toplife

    Toplife, a smart device application, is now available for downloading.

    So far, six luxury brands including La Perla, Rimowa, B&O Play, Trussardi and Emporio Armani have joined the Toplife platform. JD.com suggested in the statement that more brands will be joining the platform, including ones that will be launching their first ever online stores in China.

     

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    [LUXURY] | #Luxury #Brands Are In Danger Of Losing American #Millennials | @Forbes

    FROM PAMELA N. DANZIGER | FORBES | http://bit.ly/2gZkH16

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    @Hermes_Paris : Morphing into a #megabrand | via Luca Solca Exane BNP

    JANUARY 2017 | LUCA SOLCA | EXANE BNP

    HERMES INTERNATIONAL: HERMES MORPHING INTO A MEGA- BRAND

    [TO CONTACT US]

    The Hermès paradigm (as we saw it)
    Over time, Hermès has built a most enviable position in the luxury goods industry (The Epitome of Modern Luxury). This - in our view - was built on four pillars: 1) frustrating demand for its iconic leather models; 2) using adjacent product categories to provide accessible entry price points (Entry Price Points and the real Nature of Luxury Goods), while keeping the core leather products expensive and out of reach (Category Segregation); 3) sticking to organic growth and avoiding acquisitions; and 4) maximising retail space productivity and ROIC.

    Hermès is changing ...
    Hermès seems to be moving away from its tried-and-tested formula of frustrating demand for its iconic products. It has, in fact, increased leather goods manufacturing capacity over the past few years. The principle of 'category segregation' also seems to have been discarded, as consumers can buy Hermès handbags at significantly lower prices and just north of EUR1,000. These are not Birkin or Kelly, obviously, but they are still Hermès handbags: Evelyne, Garden Party, Picotin, etc.

    ... and morphing into a Mega-Brand
    We think that 'demand frustration' and 'category segregation' were the two traits that set Hermès apart from mega-brand peers. With these gone, the 'genetic difference' between Hermès and - say - Louis Vuitton is more difficult to identify. Hermès is still more desirable in the eyes of some consumer nationalities (Measuring Brand Exclusivity and Desirability - China), but this seems more a difference in 'intensity' than in 'nature' as other consumers seem to have the opposite perception (Measuring Brand Exclusivity and Desirability - France).

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    Behind Hong Kong’s Failing Appeal as a Luxury Destination | #HK #luxury

    FROM OBSERVER.COM | BY JEENA SHARMA | JANUARY, 03 2017

    Chinese shoppers are no longer blinded by bling, visitors can get better deals elsewhere

    The latest dent in Hong Kong’s flailing retail market came with U.S. clothing brand Abercrombie & Fitch calling time on its flagship store two years before the end of its lease.

    The city, which has witnessed a consistent luxury slump since 2013, saw many major brands such as Ralph Lauren, Forever 21, Prada and Paul Smith pull out flagships earlier this year. Italian luxury clothing and accessories label Tonio Lamborghini also shut more than 10 of its stores and in-store counters in the city. Official Hong Kong government data shows a consistent decline in retail sales since 2013 through 2016, when sales reached their lowest point. While Abercrombie & Fitch, which is battling with its own financial instability, blames exorbitant rents (HK$7 million ($0.9 million in monthly rent) as the prime reason, for other brands the picture is less clear.

    With the amount of Mainland Chinese shoppers the city was host to, Hong Kong was once hailed as the ‘Great Mall of China.’  However, Chinese shopping tourism hit a major lull post the anti-corruption crackdown initiated by President Xi Jinping in 2012. The initiative, intended to eliminate corruption of  high profile Chinese government officials had the biggest negative impact on the retail market, particularly in luxury. The high exchange value of the Hong Kong dollar further contributed to the weakening of  the city’s position as a retail destination, as the territory price advantage gradually diminished for Chinese tourists.

    “Shopping in Hong Kong is no longer a bargain for Chinese tourists. The traveling Chinese consumer is now opting for alternative destinations like South Korea, Japan, or Greece. These are places with a little bit more character, a distinct point of view, or places that offer experiences beyond shopping,”  Saisangeeth Daswani, Advisory Strategist at innovation and trend research corporation, Stylus, told Observer.com.

    The evolving tastes and aesthetic of the Chinese consumer seem to be another important factor responsible for the retail shift. While Hong Kong offers some of the best-known designer stores in the world, it fails to attract the increasingly sophisticated and well-informed shoppers from abroad. Both domestic and foreign consumers in the city have become smarter about where to find products for the lowest prices and demand more in return for their money.

    “What’s key for luxury brands in Hong Kong is to consider the consumer’s changing mindset and offer more immersive, unconventional and discovery-based experiences,” said Daswani. “The luxury brands have been too focused on products, prices and sales. Consumers want more from their purchases than simply getting their hands on the latest accessory, they want an experience, a story to tell.”  Studies indicate that Chinese consumers now look to distinguish their choices from the most obvious mainstream brands and regular edition products. Flashy logos and shiny watches just don’t hold as much appeal as they did anymore.

    “The Asian consumer’s style sense is evolving, and their fashion purchasing behavior is becoming more European. The appeal of the preppy look is diminishing and people don’t see the need to buy luxury when attractive premium brands offer similar looks,” agreed Jaana Jätyri, CEO at trend forecasting agency, Trendstop.

    louis vuitton, fashion, luxury, hong-kong

    Since most of the luxury category brands are only accessible to the Chinese shopper who is able to travel beyond China, many have opted to simply shop online, much like the American consumer.

    Prada, which also closed much of its primary stores in the city, indicated the brand will now cater to the Chinese market through e-commerce. “The Hong Kong closure is part of a worldwide, strategic realignment of brand retail channels. Over the next two years, Prada will strengthen its own e-commerce platform, giving priority to China, Hong Kong and Singapore with the objective of achieving global reach,” an official spokesperson for the company told the Observer.

    prada, fashion, luxury, hong-kong

    While this could eventually strengthen a new shopping model for the country, unfortunately it means more woes for Hong Kong’s traditional retail market. However, Daswani believes all hope is not lost. As retail rents in Hong Kong continue to fall as a result of high end departures, mid-market, ‘contemporary fashion’ and affordable luxury brands are jumping in. Moreover, analysts predict that if the exchange values of the HK dollar stabilize in 2017 leading into increased consumer confidence, retail sales may slowly recover during 2018 in Hong Kong, albeit in a different kind of retail store.

    Whether the city will regain its status as a hot shopping heaven, only time will tell. As of now, an overall uncertainty clouds the Hong Kong luxury market, and it’s up to the retailers to adapt to the new consumer interests and adjust to this broadening notion of luxury. Elsewhere, shoppers are experiencing a rise in customization offers, one offs, local exclusive pieces, limited editions and in-store exclusive events, Hong Kong retailers may need to catch up.

    [LIRE L'ARTICLE EN ENTIER]

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    In 2017’s, #luxury brands will have to work a lot harder to sell their pricey goods | @adetem @

    FROM QUARTZ MEDIA LLC | WRITTEN BY MARC BAIN | 24 JANUARY, 04 2017

    Last year was a bad one for many companies selling expensive fashion, handbags, and jewelry. For the first time since the financial crisis of 2008, the global market for personal luxury goods failed to grow, stalling at €249 billion (about $258 billion).

    luxury, china, fashion, growth, bnp, exanebnp

    The good news is that 2017 should see a return to growth, according to a Dec. 28 report on the global luxury market by management consulting firm Bain & Company, only it won’t look anything like the boom years from 2010 to 2015, when global sales of such goods jumped 45%, fueled by Chinese consumers with high-end appetites. The slowing of China’s economy and its government’s ongoing crackdown on corruption, paired with turmoil in the US and Europe from Brexit, terrorism, and the US presidential election, have created a “new normal” of low single-digit growth and intense competition. The years ahead will produce “clear winners and losers,” Bain says, determined by which brands can read the field and respond best.

    China is at the center of this shift. Today Chinese shoppers account for 30% of all sales of personal luxury goods. While Bain foresees the Chinese market improving again after contracting slightly in 2016, it isn’t likely to return to its former rate of expansion, which insulated brands’ bottom lines from other problems. “We expect around 30 million new customers in the next five years coming from the Chinese middle class,” Claudia D’Arpizio, a Bain partner and lead luxury analyst, told Quartz in an interview last year. “But this is nothing comparable to the past big waves of demographics entering [the market]. This new normality will mean mainly trying to grow organically in the same consumer base, being more innovative with product, more innovative with communication.”

    Exane BNP Paribas echoed the thought in a December research note to clients. “The peak of the largest nationality wave ever to benefit luxury goods is behind us,” the authors wrote. “Brands need a new paradigm, other than opening more stores in China and bumping up prices.”

    The period luxury is entering could see some of its slowest growth since it started opening up to a mass audience around 1994. That was the year, D’Arpizio noted, that “the jeweler of kings and queens,” Cartier, launched its first lower-priced line for mainstream consumers. Other brands followed in search of greater sales, and names “like Gucci, Prada, also Bulgari were really growing, doubling size every year, sometimes triple-digit growth rates, opening up to 60 stores every year and covering all the capitals across the globe,” she said.

    Around 2001 came another period of expansion when brands became global retailers, not just selling wholesale, amid a spate of acquisitions that would eventually create today’s giant luxury conglomerates, including LVMH and Kering (previously Gucci Group). By the time of the financial crisis, luxury had conquered much of the US, Europe, and Japan, and then China came along to offer more unfettered growth.

    There’s no new China, however, at least not now. The next big luxury market is likely Africa, particularly countries such as Congo, Angola, and South Africa. But D’Arpizio estimated this scenario won’t come about for seven to 10 years, meaning only moderate expansion for some time.

    “In the new normal, we expect a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 3% to 4% for the luxury goods market through 2020, to approximately €280 billion,” Bain’s report says. “That is significantly slower than the rapid expansion from the mid-1990s to the late 2000s.”

    Other characteristics of this new period include more shoppers making purchases at home. Last year, local purchases exceeded tourist purchases by five percentage points, the first time since 2001 that has happened.

    And digital sales will keep growing. Last year they accounted for 8% of the industry.

    [LIRE L'ARTICLE EN ENTIER] 

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    #Skincare | #Chanel uncovers powerful plants in global tour | @cosmetics @Chanel

    FROM LUXURY DAILY | FROM SATRAH JONES | JANUARY 5, 2017

    France’s Chanel is exploring the anti-aging secrets of three far-flung populations with a shared claim.

    The beauty brand’s newly released Blue Serum took inspiration from Blue Zones around the world, places where the locals live remarkably longer lives. In an effort to prove the claims of its product, Chanel is inviting consumers to journey to these locales in a series of short films.

    Chanel was reached for comment.

    FEELING BLUE

    Chanel’s Blue Serum is being touted by the brand as “a new horizon for skincare.”Explaining the inspiration and ingredient sourcing for this serum, Chanel filmed travel diaries to the Blue Zones that contributed to the product.

    Against footage taken in Costa Rica, a female narrator says, “You can feel the life force in everything and everywhere.” Portraying this energy are images of waterfalls amid greenery.

    chanel, blue serum, skincare, costa rica

    Still from Chanel's Blue Serum film

    The voiceover explains how Costa Rica’s green coffee can only be found in the country, which may contribute to the locals’ long lives.

    In Italy, the Mediterranean locale is said to be the home of centuries’ old olive trees.

    Chanel turns its attention to the sun in Greece, which it says is in everything. This includes soil, plants and the lentisk tree.

    chanel, blue serum, skincare, costa rica

    Discover the Power of Blue Serum - Chanel

    All videos include the statement, “It’s something special. Some call it a mystery. It’s just life.”

    These ingredients—sourced from Nicoya, Costa Rica; Sardinia, Italy and Ikaria, Greece, all hold antioxidant properties. According to the brand, a trial found the serum to reduce wrinkles, even skin tone and firm skin.

    [LIRE L'ARTICLE EN ENTIER]

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    #Burberry added fuel to the conversation surrounding the "see-now, buy-now movement" | @buberry @adetem #luxury

    ARTICLE PARU DANS LE LUXURY DAILY | DECEMBER 2016 

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    Burberry's early adoption

    British fashion label Burberry came in behind Chanel [2016 LUXURY MARKETER OF THE YEAR],  placing as second runner's-up for its first-mover status.

    Burberry added fuel to the conversation surrounding the see-now, buy-now movement, announcing early in the year that it would be changing its runway show schedule. This move consolidated its presentations to two a year, showing men's and women's collections together (Burberry updates fashion calendar to meet global demand).

    The brand also took a different move when it enlisted Brooklyn Beckham to shoot a campaign, having the teenage son of David and Victoria Beckham capture the experience on Snapchat (Burberry targets younger market using Brooklyn Beckham, Snapchat).

    Burberry was became the first fashion label to create an Apple TV app, becoming the first brand to broadcast a fashion show on the platform (Burberry launches on Apple TV with menswear show live-stream. When launching the fragrance My Burberry Black, Burberry took advantage of a bevy of newer social media tools, such as Instagram Stories and a Snapchat filter, to create a mood around the scent.

    While unseated by Gucci in this year's L2 rankings, Burberry was positioned in second place, also showing Genius-level sill in digital.

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    #Chanel has made itself more relatable to consumers without sacrificing its prestige | @Chanel @adetem

    ARTICLE DU LUXURY DAILY | DECEMBRE 2016

    [LIRE L'ARTICLE DANS SA TOTALITE]

    First runner’s-up Chanel has made itself more relatable to consumers without sacrificing its prestige.

    The brand made moves to appeal to a younger audience, casting teens Lily-Rose Depp and Willow Smith in separate ad campaigns.

    With a continued focus on video content, Chanel introduced five new films in its “Inside Chanel” series. The brand also launched a new series of unscripted Beauty Talks, inviting personalities such as Gisele Bündchen and Keira Knightley to talk makeup and skincare with its global creative makeup and color designer Lucia Pica.

    Chanel, luxury, fashion, luxury daily

    Chanel’s social media efforts helped the brand top Brandwatch’s rankings of fashion companies, thanks to visibility and increased reach (Chanel, Lexus top social media performers in fashion, automotive fields). The same researcher also found it to be the most reputable brand on social media (Chanel most reputable brand despite low sentiment: report).

    The brand also got a nod in the beauty space, with an MBLM report finding it to be the most successful at creating intimacy and an emotional connection with followers (Chanel ranks at top of beauty industry’s brand intimacy chart: report).

    A key indicator of brand positioning and desirability, Chanel is one of the highest sellers on the secondhand luxury site The RealReal (Chanel, mega-brands dominate resale market as new sectors surge: report). Chanel was also one of the only brands to record growth in value in Millward Brown’s BrandZ report (Louis Vuitton, Hermès and Chanel only houses to record growth: report).

    Chanel, luxury, fashion, luxury daily

    Aside from its desirability as a brand to own, Chanel was named the most coveted place to work in a survey of millennials conducted by Women’s Wear Daily (www.luxurydaily.com/louis-vuitton-hermes-and-chanel-only-houses-to-record-growth-report/.

    Alongside digital efforts, Chanel courted younger clients with a backstage-themed pop-up. The brand also branched out into the conceptual, curating a daily content hub with i-D magazine (Chanel, i-D magazine advocate for female artistic talent on daily content hub).