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beauty

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    [#LUXURYLAB] [SHOP] | #First #Tom #Ford #Beauty Store Opens in #London | @BUSINESSWIRE

    FROM | BUSINESSWIRE | http://bit.ly/2jkMC9l

    #First #Tom #Ford #Beauty Store Opens in #London

    Debuting on November 20, 2017, the first TOM FORD beauty standalone store is the ultimate in luxury beauté, expressed through Tom Ford’s singular vision. Located in historic Covent Garden (3 The Market Building) this store is a pivotal moment in the evolution of the brand.

    The new design of light and layered grey glass sculpture creates a visually arresting play on objects and space while highlighting his collection of makeup, skincare and fragrance for women and men. Tom Ford’s inimitable touch reverberates in every dimension of the store, beginning with the LED screens lining the façade with the latest campaigns. Halos of light and floating white marble slabs showcase the exquisite design of his products, fully immersing you in the convergence of glamour and technology for the most luxurious retail environment. A complete vision of the breadth of the world of TOM FORD BEAUTY, each room in the 130 square meter store features its own enhanced shopping experiences, equipped with various digital technologies that unite technical innovation, bespoke sculptural design and the most coveted customer services.

    First, Tom Ford, Beauty, London

    COLOR ROOM
    Discover the latest launches, most wanted colors, and augmented reality, that allow customers to virtually try on shades from the highly coveted lip color collection.

    FRAGRANCE ROOM
    Enter Tom Ford’s personal scent laboratory, where the brand is transforming how consumers trial fragrance. The room features a dedicated interactive scenting installation where guests can digitally explore the unconventional scents that make up the artisanal Private Blend Collection. A dramming bar offers customized services, from luxury sampling to scent styling.

    Explore the Oud and Neroli Portofino Collections, the Tom Ford for Men skincare and grooming collection and a luxury gifting station.

    MAKEUP ROOM
    An intimate room that offers personalized makeup services and demonstrations by a Tom Ford Beauty Specialist. For the first time, customers can record their makeup applications for use at home as a personalized how-to, sent with a shopping list of products used throughout the service.

    PRIVATE MAKEUP SERVICES ROOM
    The Private Makeup Services Room provides appointment-only services bookable online and in store, with Tom Ford Beauty Specialists. The brand offers fragrance customization and makeup services such as application, Tom Ford’s Shade and Illuminate philosophy, definitive brows, VIP masterclasses and bridal services.

    There is also the opportunity to record your customized how-to for these services.

    VIP/EVENT SPACE
    This is the ultimate space for private cosmetic and fragrance one-to-one consultations.

     The sculptural and lighting design and digital screens create the most exclusive space to showcase the products.

    GROOMING ROOM
    Experience the Tom Ford for Men skincare and grooming collection in London’s most luxurious space for men. Guests can choose from a range of exclusive grooming services by an expert barber, including a Beard Trim, the Express Facial, and a classic hot towel, close-cut Wet Shave, all bookable online at tomfordbeauty.co.uk/appointments.

     

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    [#LUXURYLAB] [ECO] | #Clarins, #L’Oreal & Others Launch #Initiative to Improve #Beauty #Supply #Chain | @ENVIRONMENTAL LEADER

    DE JENNIFER HERMES | ENVIRONMENTAL LEADER | http://bit.ly/2zKQw5e

    #Clarins, #L’Oreal & Others Launch #Initiative to Improve #Beauty #Supply #Chain

    Clarins, Coty, L’Oreal and Groupe Rocher have joined with EcoVadis to launch the Responsible Beauty Initiative (RBI), a group that the companies say will accelerate social and environmental performance and progress throughout the beauty supply chain. EcoVadis, a provider of supplier sustainability ratings for supply chains, is working with the companies to ensure their suppliers have sound environmental business practices in place.

    The announcement comes at a time when few companies (just 15%) say they have total visibility into the environmental actions of their tier one and tier two suppliers (per an EcoVadis report published earlier this year).

    RBI is meant to help companies to boost environmental responsibility in their supply chains by:

    • driving a common understanding of sustainability performance across the industry
    • sharing best practices and processes
    • leveraging common tools to create efficiencies and benefits for suppliers

    The RBI is built on a Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) rating platform, operated by EcoVadis, as a common foundation for supplier assessment and interaction. It will address the unique opportunities and challenges of the beauty industry global supply chains and will aim to drive the continuous improvement of sustainability practices, the companies say. The founding members will sign the charter to officially launch RBI and invite other companies and suppliers in the industry to join.

    Clarins, L'Oréal, Initiative, beauty, supply chain

    Nearly half (45%) of organizations say their sustainable procurement program covers most (75% or more) of their spend volume today, a significant jump from the 27% that reported the same in 2013, according to EcoVadis. Yet while supplier coverage has increased, depth of supply chain CSR visibility remains elusive: just 15% of organizations said they have complete supply chain visibility into the CSR and sustainability performance of both tier one and two suppliers, and only six% reported full visibility into tier three suppliers and beyond. This is the number one challenge today for sustainable procurement teams. “It is often further down in supply chains where the most significant risks lie, and the need to scale up programs to increase the depth of program visibility to the ‘long tail’ of global supply chains has never been more urgent,” the report stated.

    But companies looking for sustainable sourcing nirvana are making progress: The EcoVadis/HEC study also found that organizations collecting sustainability data are actively using the intelligence to guide sourcing decisions. By making CSR data a key factor in the sourcing process, organizations are incentivizing suppliers to be more sustainable and act more responsibly across the board.

    The report found that 97% of organizations place a high level of importance on sustainable procurement, continuing an upward trend seen in the last decade.

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    Are cosmetics ads subtly telling women they are flawed and require fixing? | by @HelenRingrow @Palgrave_

    A lot has been made of how airbrushed images in cosmetics advertising campaigns are setting beauty standards that are biologically impossible. But does that apply to the language used in the ads as well?

    A lot has been made of how airbrushed images in cosmetics advertising campaigns are setting beauty standards that are biologically impossible. But does that apply to the language used in the ads as well?

    A linguist from the University of Portsmouth believes the choice of words might also play a subliminal role in encouraging women to see themselves as “flawed and needing to be fixed”.

    Helen Ringrow, a lecturer in Communication Studies and Applied Linguistics, says the underlying theme in advertisements for women’s cosmetics was the constant need to fix problems including dry hair, lack of glow and poor skin. She said: “The language used tells women their faces, hair and bodies are always falling below some imaginary standard. It makes women feel they’re never quite measuring up, never quite right. “It also creates problems we never knew we had, such as selling us deodorant which makes our underarm skin tone appear more even.”

    She says the multi-billion pound beauty industry “thrives on making women’s bodies appear to be a flawed commodity which cosmetics can fix”. As part of her research, Ringrow studied more than 400 beauty ads in Cosmopolitan and Elle magazines over a six-month period in 2011. She noted subtle linguistic differences in tone and language in French and English advertisements but the underlying messages were similar.

    Ringrow said: “The advertisements tell women that their bodies need endless work and that they are not quite good enough without the use of cosmetics.” She also added the advertising also relied heavily on scientific language, saying: “Women are bombarded by a cocktail of scientific words, sex and youthfulness in cosmetics advertising.

    “You’ll find bold claims for the power of something scientific-sounding, like peptides or bio-proteins, which are not always proven, especially not in the small quantities in which they are found in many cosmetics products.”

    Ringrow has revealed the results of her research in a book titled The Language of Cosmetics Advertising, published by Palgrave.

     

     

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    Bobbi Brown Is Leaving Her Namesake Cosmetics Line | @justbobbibrown @BobbiBrown #cosmetics #beauty #makeup

    BY RACHEL JACOBY ZOLDANRJACOBY13 | allure.com
    DECEMBER 19, 2016

    [LIRE L'ARTICLE EN ENTIER]

    In a move I didn't see coming, Bobbi Brown is leaving her namesake cosmetics line after 25 years, WWD reports. (I know, right?!) Bobbi Brown Cosmetics, owned by beauty giant Estée Lauder Companies (which recently acquired Too Faced Cosmetics as a part of a burgeoning brand portfolio that also includes Origins, M.A.C., and Clinique), will continue to exist, but Brown is expected to leave the company by the end of the year. (Read: like ten days from now.).

    And while we're sad that the creative genius behind Bobbi Brown Cosmetics (the Bobbi Brown—the one who sat in the backseat of an Uber with our beauty editor recently—more on that later) is leaving her brand, we know it's still in good hands as Peter Lichtenthal, global brand president, will continue to oversee the business in her absence. While Brown has yet to reveal her next move, sources speculated to WWD that she'll have a new business endeavor to focus on in 2017.

    But hang on. Let's pour one out for Bobbi Brown and her line for a second. I'd argue that she was not only one of the original pioneers of the natural beauty look, but rather the official inspiration for the no-makeup makeup movement that I actually live by. It's soft, pretty, and frankly unfiltered in a world where seemingly everything is Facetuned, Photoshopped, or "tweaked just a tiny bit." Fabrizio Freda, the CEO and president of the Estée Lauder Companies, told WWD that Bobbi Brown Cosmetics is a "global prestige cosmetics powerhouse, with a highly promising future, poised for its next chapter of growth."

    Exactly what that chapter will entail, of course, remains to be seen. And I'm still really jealous of Lexi, our beauty editor, who, yes, got to ride in an Uber with Bobbi and get her makeup done and of course emerged with that ethereal, lit-from-within, only-Bobbi-Brown-could-produce glow.

    Thank you, Bobbi Brown, for your 25 years of flawless skin and barely there makeup. Our faces salute you. Mine does, at least.

     

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    LF #Beauty: meeting Asian consumers' needs has 'never been more challenging' [#skincare #China #beauty #import #cosmetics]

    LF Beauty: meeting Asian consumers' needs has 'never been more challenging'

    By Lucy Whitehouse +, 13-Jul-2016, cosmeticsdesign-asia

    The president of LF Beauty, a third party manufacturer and supplier, has spoken of the challenges and opportunities being posed for beauty by the Asia market.

    The article outlines that it has never been more challenging, while there have never been more opportunities for brands to satisfy the customers’ needs. According to Raymond “Asian beauty is now setting the pace for the world”. China’s customers have a rising demand for K-beauty products, whereby Korean brands face the challenge of acting with insider knowledge of the Chinese market.

    Indeed, the Korean International Trade Association found out that Korean companies accounted for 22.1% of China’s imported cosmetics in 2015, closing the gap with the French who have a market share of 30.6%. During the first seven months of the year, China’s imports of cosmetics products rose 36.1% to $1.67 billion.

    [READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE]

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    What is halal skin care and makeup, and what are the trends? [#skincare #makeup #beauty #cosmetics #halal #asia #middle east]

    What is halal skin care and makeup, and what are the trends?

    By Lucy Whitehouse +, cosmeticsdesign-europe, 06-Jul-2016

    Halal is becoming big business for the beauty industry globally, and particularly in Asia: a central focus for this week’s in-cosmetics Korea event, we take a closer look at the trend.

    Kunal Mahajan, project manager of Chemicals & Energy at Kline - top management consulting firm serving the Chemicals industry globally – explains in the article that “halal” can not only be associated with food and beverages, but that its denomination is equally appropriate for pharmaceuticals, personal care, skincare and hair care products.

    But what makes a product halal and why does “halal” become a trend in cosmetics?
    Mahajan outlines the answers in detail in his article: The key contributors to this trend is economics and the changing consumer lifestyle.

    According to Mahajan, top growth regions for halal products will be the Middle East and Asia, particularly South Asia and Southeast Asia.

    [READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE]

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    Ethnic #skin care: the way forward or outmoded concept? [#skincare #beauty #anti-aging #ethnicity #China]

    Ethnic skin care: the way forward or outmoded concept?
    By DSM Nutritional Products, Ltd 16-Jun-2016, CosmeticsDesign-Europe.com

    Whilst the power of beautiful skin is undeniably universal, skin care needs vary widely from person to person. Men’s skin is not the same as women’s; younger skin has different needs than older skin. Skin may be dry or oily. And skin – the largest organ in the body – differs in another way: it comes in a beautiful range of tones which are visible links to our genetic and ethnic heritage.

    So what are the broader influences behind consumer choices when it comes to skin care products?

    Skin: an evolving story
    In many regions of the world – China being a case in point – the population is still fairly homogeneous and people may have quite specific skin care needs based on cultural as well as biological factors. DSM Consumer Insight researchers who went to that country found that definitions of beauty in China often differ widely from those cited in many Western countries. They also found that Chinese women had different anti-aging skin care priorities, tending to be less worried about wrinkles than about loss of skin elasticity, enlarged pores and uneven tone.

    For manufacturers of skin care products this presents both challenges and opportunities.
    A DSM Insights team that conducted a field study in Los Angeles and New York among mothers, daughters, aunts and friends obtained a myriad of rich insights into their notions regarding ethnicity and skin care. Many interviewees declared their opposition to the idea of categorizing people by ethnic group, believing that this simply isn't consistent with people's views of the world today, or their view of themselves.

    The take-away message from consumer insights is therefore that the need for multifunctional skin actives which work equally well for all skin tones and types is set to grow.
    In their study DSM investigated the global applicability of a peptide ingredient amongst three different ethnicities (Caucasian, Asian and African), whereby they discovered new cosmetic properties.

    • Multifunctional anti-ager for all skin tones
    • Visible reduction of the signs of aging and shiny skin
    • Improved skin smoothness and appearance resulting in younger-looking skin

    The peptide therefore has applications as a global anti-aging cream and serum, and as a skin beauty maximizer mask. It is China-listed.


    [READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE]

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    The Body Shop is turning to new product launches in the #MiddleEast [@TheBodyShopUK #beauty]

    The Body Shop looks to gain momentum in the Middle East with new launches

    By Andrew McDougall+, 25-Mar-2016

    The Body Shop is turning to new product launches in the Middle East as it looks drive sales in the region off the back of a good year in 2015.

    According to parent company L’Oréal’s annual results, the UK-based brand recorded 10.7% growth based on reported figures for the year, and this was thanks to good momentum in the Middle East, as well as in Africa and Europe, only offset by challenges in Asia and North America.

    [READ THE FULL ARTICLE]

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    #SKII: A Sucess Key (SK) issued from a traditional drink in Japan, #Saké and its craftman's fabrication [#storytelling @SKII @ProcterGamble]

    A NICE AND UNBELIEVABLE STORY

    During a visit of a factory Saké in Kobe (Japan), Japanese scientists find that the hands of sake brewers, constantly immersed in sake yeast ferments during the manufacturing process, are incredibly soft and young, and contrast with their faces marked by old age.

    Discover in this eye-catching movie the story of Sucess Key of SKII, a Japanese skincare brand born in 1970.

    Click to watch the short video about the Saké brewers


    1970- Discover of the Pitera, the ingredient component of th SKII anti-ageing cream

    1990- SKII is bought by Procter & Gamble. This is the beginning of an incredible story with a sales development all over the World: Asia, Australia, Spain, UK, USA and South America. 

     

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    [Figure You Should Know] –18,3 billion $ is the estimated Indian Luxury Market in 2016 [#economy #luxury #promiseconsulting @LuxurySociety]

    The Indian luxury market is expected to cross that amount during this year.

    According to a research report by Euromonitor, India merely contributes 1-2% to the global luxury trade. However, despite this insignificant percentage, the market is growing at a compounded annual growth rate (CAGR) of about 25%. Indian luxury market is expected to cross $18.3 billion by 2016 from the current $14.7 billion.

    As per a study by Assocham , in 2015, luxury jewellery, electronics, SUV cars and fine dining have grown immensely. Apparel, accessories, wines and spirits are growing as strongly as in the past. Consumption of branded wine is also likely to register a over 30% increase in the metro cities.

    Indian brands are starting to be well-known, with Gitanjali Group (jewellery retailers), Titan Company (5th largest manufacturer of wrist watch in the world) and PC Jeweller Limited (jewellery retailers) now accessing the top 50 luxury brands worldwide.

    Finally, it is to be noted that cosmetics and beauty products markets are highly lucrative in India, since women’s purchasing power is greater.

    READ THE FULL ARTICLE : [Luxury Society]

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